1:38 pm - Mon, Oct 20, 2014
240 notes
currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.
"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.

"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

1:36 pm
109 notes

libutron:

Wooly-legged Jumping Spider - Saitis barbipes

In accordance with the requirements of courtship in jumping spiders, in which the visual cues are the primary releaser, males of the Wooly-legged Jumping Spider, Saitis barbipes (Salticidae) are highly skilled.

Although most males jumping spiders use their first legs for signaling toward the female, some genera (e.g. Saitis, Maratus, Habronattus) have specialized their third legs for that purpose. In the Mediterranean Saitis barbipes, the third legs, larger than the others, are red and bear conspicuous black hair brushes on tibia and metatarsus. During courtship these legs are waved up and down, and from time to time he makes  the white-tipped tarsi vibrate rapidly in a plane perpendicular to the body axis. The vibration frequency is high enough to produce a sound perceivable by man.

Although the male seems extenuated by this performance, the effect on the female is impressive, she collapses on her legs and half turns her abdomen ventral side upward.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credits: [Top: ©kankikun | Locality: not indicated, 2012] - [Bottom: ©Thomas Roppenecker | Locality: not indicated, 2014]

10:34 pm - Sun, Oct 19, 2014
869 notes
ourtimeorg:

Exactly.
10:34 pm
3,539 notes
10:33 pm
2,187 notes
Unease, anxiety, tension, stress, worry—all forms of fear—are caused by too much future, and not enough presence. Guilt, regret, resentment, grievances, sadness, bitterness, and all forms of nonforgiveness are caused by too much past, and not enough presence.
Eckhart Tolle (via lazyyogi)

(via my-spiritual-happiness)

10:33 pm
3,486 notes
10:32 pm
159,110 notes
10:30 pm
6,495 notes
7:58 pm - Sat, Oct 18, 2014
1,002 notes
azspot:

Tina Dupuy
7:57 pm
145 notes

mindblowingscience:

Distant Galaxies Reveal 3D Cosmic Web for the First Time

On the largest scales, networks of gaseous filaments span hundreds of millions of light-years, connecting massive galaxy clusters. But this gas is so rarified, it’s impossible to see directly.

For years, astronomers have used quasars — brilliant galactic centers fueled by supermassive black holes rapidly accreting material — to map the otherwise invisible matter.

But now, for the first time, a team of astronomers led by Khee-Gan Lee, a post-doc at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, has managed to create a three-dimensional map of the large-scale structure of the Universe using distant galaxies. And the advantages are numerous.

Continue Reading.

(via astro-stoner)

7:56 pm
485,367 notes
silversora:

"Dave.."
"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."
"DAVE."

silversora:

"Dave.."

"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."

"DAVE."

(Source: stigmartyr762, via 5-methoxy-n-n-dimethyltryptamine)

7:54 pm
16,313 notes
7:49 pm
187 notes
scinote:

Entomovectoring Research is the Bee’s Knees

Brown rot, a disease caused by the fungus Monilinia fructicola, is a major problem for cherry farmers in Australia. It can be prevented by spraying cherry blossoms with a fungicide, but that’s very costly. In fact, spraying costs around $150 million a year, not to mention the fact that run-off could have devastating environmental impacts, contributing to Colony Collapse Disorder in bees.
Enter Dr. Katja Hogendoorn, a postdoctoral research associate with the University of Adelaide’s School of Agriculture, Food, and Wine. Rather than using insecticides, Dr. Hogendoorn and her team have adopted a technique called “entomovectoring” (yes, literally “insect-moving”) to stop the spread of brown rot by using bees.
The process is actually pretty simple. On their way out of their hive, bees are dusted with a biological control agent that contains spores of a parasitic fungus. These spores get captured in the bees’ body hair and, in a process startlingly similar to pollination, get left behind on whatever flowers the bees visit. These spores then prevent brown rot from colonizing the flower, allowing for a much more accurate and eco-friendly method of fungus prevention. Entomovectoring is currently used in Europe to control grey mold growth in strawberries, but this is the first time it has ever been used in Australia and also the first time in the world it has been used on cherries.
Hopefully, this leap forward in agricultural science will allow for benefits to bees as well as humans. Bee numbers have been depleting at an alarming rate in recent years because of the widespread use of pesticides and fungicides, which lower bees’ immune responses and cause an easy target for parasites. If entomovectoring is adopted around the world, that means a lot more farmers may begin keeping bees, and a lot fewer pesticides will be used. And that can only bring good things to our buzzing friend, the bee.
To read more, please click on the picture above.
If you’re interested in reading the original paper about bees being used to prevent grey mold in European strawberries: http://statisticalconsulting.org/Shafir.pdf
If you’re interested in learning more about Colony Collapse Disorder: http://qz.com/107970/scientists-discover-whats-killing-the-bees-and-its-worse-than-you-thought/

Submitted by Nick V., Discoverer.
Edited by Margaret G.

scinote:

Entomovectoring Research is the Bee’s Knees

Brown rot, a disease caused by the fungus Monilinia fructicola, is a major problem for cherry farmers in Australia. It can be prevented by spraying cherry blossoms with a fungicide, but that’s very costly. In fact, spraying costs around $150 million a year, not to mention the fact that run-off could have devastating environmental impacts, contributing to Colony Collapse Disorder in bees.

Enter Dr. Katja Hogendoorn, a postdoctoral research associate with the University of Adelaide’s School of Agriculture, Food, and Wine. Rather than using insecticides, Dr. Hogendoorn and her team have adopted a technique called “entomovectoring” (yes, literally “insect-moving”) to stop the spread of brown rot by using bees.

The process is actually pretty simple. On their way out of their hive, bees are dusted with a biological control agent that contains spores of a parasitic fungus. These spores get captured in the bees’ body hair and, in a process startlingly similar to pollination, get left behind on whatever flowers the bees visit. These spores then prevent brown rot from colonizing the flower, allowing for a much more accurate and eco-friendly method of fungus prevention. Entomovectoring is currently used in Europe to control grey mold growth in strawberries, but this is the first time it has ever been used in Australia and also the first time in the world it has been used on cherries.

Hopefully, this leap forward in agricultural science will allow for benefits to bees as well as humans. Bee numbers have been depleting at an alarming rate in recent years because of the widespread use of pesticides and fungicides, which lower bees’ immune responses and cause an easy target for parasites. If entomovectoring is adopted around the world, that means a lot more farmers may begin keeping bees, and a lot fewer pesticides will be used. And that can only bring good things to our buzzing friend, the bee.

To read more, please click on the picture above.

If you’re interested in reading the original paper about bees being used to prevent grey mold in European strawberries: http://statisticalconsulting.org/Shafir.pdf

If you’re interested in learning more about Colony Collapse Disorder: http://qz.com/107970/scientists-discover-whats-killing-the-bees-and-its-worse-than-you-thought/

Submitted by Nick V., Discoverer.

Edited by Margaret G.

(via starsaremymuse)

7:47 pm
146 notes
Fortify yourself with contentment, for this is an impregnable fortress.
Anonymous (via fuckyeahyoga)
3:59 pm - Fri, Oct 17, 2014
2,451 notes
the-personal-quotes:

Are you a teen? This blog is for you!
Following
Likes
More Likes
Install Headline