5:06 pm - Mon, Sep 15, 2014
1,000 notes

membracid:

blujayart:

This is one of the craziest things I’d ever heard of, and I spent the entire rest of the day after learning this being super excited (and slightly terrified) about it.

If you can’t read my handwriting, this is Epomis dejeani. There are all kinds of crazy videos of these things taking down frogs and toads (you might not wanna watch if you’re squeamish, they get a bit gruesome). In that last link, the frog eats the larva, which continues moving around inside it until the frog spits it up two hours later, at which point the larva turns around and eats thefrog HOLY CRAP

Also did I mention the adults actually paralyze their victims? Scientists aren’t even sure how they do it— they bite the back, but the spinal cord is actually intact

So yeah, that’s freakin nuts. Here’s an article with more information on this ridiculous species. I STILL can’t get over this.

Ha! Love this! :)

(via alex-does-science)

10:21 pm - Sat, Sep 13, 2014
853 notes
surf4living:

michael hopkins
ph: ray collins

surf4living:

michael hopkins

ph: ray collins

(via summertime-surf)

9:57 am - Tue, Sep 9, 2014
497 notes
kropotkitten:

A cat was shot for treasonIn World War OneIt had acted as an intermediary   Between Allied and Axis lines:  English and German soldiersCould send messagesTo each otherBy tying scraps of paper To the cat’s collar. The cat then ran across No Man’s Land,From one trench to the other.   When the War Office found out, Allied superior officersOrdered that the cat, nicknamed Felix,Should be shot for its being a go-between,And thus enabling fraternization Between the warring troops On the Western Front.  For, after a Christmas truce When enmity miraculously faded And one German dug-out sang ‘Heilige Nacht’ As its English opposite number joined inWith ‘Silent Night’;And when deadly enemiesShyly scrambled outInto the open air Clutching presentsOf rum and schnapps, and lebkochen  And Huntley and Palmer’s digestive biscuits;And when they swapped them with broad smiles,And when impromptu football matches Broke out up and down the battle lines…These popular displays of comradeship; These congenial armistices;These undeclared cease-fires Were outlawed by the government Who declared that all such happenings Were high treason,And subject to the same condign punishment As cowardice, namely the firing squad. Felix the cat, however, (Called Nestor by the Germans) Was a law unto itself.It would wait patiently  Whilst cheery little scrawls In English and in GermanWere being attached to its collar By trembling fingers, raw with cold:“Hello Fritz.” “Gutentag Tommy.” “Fröhliche Weihnachten, Tommy.”“Happy Christmas, Fritz.”  Back and forth the cat skipped across the snow,Across the hard, unforgiving soilOf No Man’s Land; first appearing at MonsAnd later at Passchendaele.  Then Felix – just like the animals In the Middle Ages who, notoriously,Were tried for being suspectedOf being in league with the devil – Was judged by the top military brassTo constitute a threatThrough its enabling treasonous acts, Through its being an accessoryTo the undermining of the serial hate-crimeThat was World War One;  A war crime that left fifteen million dead Including a peace cat,Who’s barely ever mentioned But whose bloodstained paw-prints  Are a lone, feline testament To war’s absurdity.   Heathcote Williams   

kropotkitten:

A cat was shot for treason
In World War One
It had acted as an intermediary   
Between Allied and Axis lines:  
English and German soldiers
Could send messages
To each other
By tying scraps of paper 
To the cat’s collar. 
The cat then ran across No Man’s Land,
From one trench to the other.  
 
When the War Office found out, 
Allied superior officers
Ordered that the cat, nicknamed Felix,
Should be shot for its being a go-between,
And thus enabling fraternization 
Between the warring troops 
On the Western Front. 
 
For, after a Christmas truce 
When enmity miraculously faded 
And one German dug-out sang ‘Heilige Nacht’ 
As its English opposite number joined in
With ‘Silent Night’;
And when deadly enemies
Shyly scrambled out
Into the open air 
Clutching presents
Of rum and schnapps, and lebkochen  
And Huntley and Palmer’s digestive biscuits;
And when they swapped them with broad smiles,
And when impromptu football matches 
Broke out up and down the battle lines…
These popular displays of comradeship; 
These congenial armistices;
These undeclared cease-fires 
Were outlawed by the government 
Who declared that all such happenings 
Were high treason,
And subject to the same condign punishment 
As cowardice, namely the firing squad.
 
Felix the cat, however, 
(Called Nestor by the Germans) 
Was a law unto itself.
It would wait patiently  
Whilst cheery little scrawls 
In English and in German
Were being attached to its collar 
By trembling fingers, raw with cold:
“Hello Fritz.” “Gutentag Tommy.” 
“Fröhliche Weihnachten, Tommy.”
“Happy Christmas, Fritz.” 
 
Back and forth the cat skipped across the snow,
Across the hard, unforgiving soil
Of No Man’s Land; first appearing at Mons
And later at Passchendaele. 
 
Then Felix – just like the animals 
In the Middle Ages who, notoriously,
Were tried for being suspected
Of being in league with the devil –
Was judged by the top military brass
To constitute a threat
Through its enabling treasonous acts, 
Through its being an accessory
To the undermining of the serial hate-crime
That was World War One;  
A war crime that left fifteen million dead 
Including a peace cat,
Who’s barely ever mentioned 
But whose bloodstained paw-prints  
Are a lone, feline testament 
To war’s absurdity.  
 
Heathcote Williams  
 

(via teayogaandrun)

10:23 pm - Mon, Sep 8, 2014
14,655 notes
consumed-youth:

Irishman Mark Boyle tried to live life with no income, no bank balance and no spending. Here’s how he finds it:
"If someone told me seven years ago, in my final year of a business and economics degree, that I’d now be living without money, I’d have probably choked on my microwaved ready meal. The plan back then was to get a ‘good’ job, make as much money as possible, and buy the stuff that would show society I was successful.
For a while I did it – I had a fantastic job managing a big organic food company; had myself a yacht on the harbour. If it hadn’t been for the chance purchase of a video called Gandhi, I’d still be doing it today. Instead, for the last fifteen months, I haven’t spent or received a single penny. Zilch.
The change in life path came one evening on the yacht whilst philosophising with a friend over a glass of merlot. Whilst I had been significantly influenced by the Mahatma’s quote “be the change you want to see in the world”, I had no idea what that change was up until then. We began talking about all major issues in the world – environmental destruction, resource wars, factory farms, sweatshop labour – and wondering which of these we would be best devoting our time to. Not that we felt we could make any difference, being two small drops in a highly polluted ocean.
But that evening I had a realisation. These issues weren’t as unrelated as I had previously thought – they had a common root cause. I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect is the factor that unites these problems.
The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that it now means we’re completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the ‘stuff’ we buy.
Very few people actually want to cause suffering to others; most just don’t have any idea that they directly are. The tool that has enabled this separation is money, especially in its globalised format.
Take this for an example: if we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today.
If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior décor.
If we had to clean our own drinking water, we probably wouldn’t shit in it.
So to be the change I wanted to see in the world, it unfortunately meant I was going to have to give up money, which I decided to do for a year initially. So I made a list of the basics I’d need to survive. I adore food, so it was at the top. There are four legs to the food-for-free table: foraging wild food, growing your own, bartering and using waste grub, of which there far too much.
On my first day I fed 150 people a three course meal with waste and foraged food. Most of the year I ate my own crops though and waste only made up about five per cent my diet. I cooked outside – rain or shine – on a rocket stove.
Next up was shelter. So I got myself a caravan from Freecycle, parked it on an organic farm I was volunteering with, and kitted it out to be off the electricity grid. I’d use wood I either coppiced or scavenged to heat my humble abode in a wood burner made from an old gas bottle, and I had a compost loo to make ‘humanure’ for my veggies.
I bathed in a river, and for toothpaste I used washed up cuttlefish bone with wild fennel seeds, an oddity for a vegan. For loo roll I’d relieve the local newsagents of its papers (I once wiped my arse with a story about myself); it wasn’t double quilted but it quickly became normal. To get around I had a bike and trailer, and the 55 km commute to the city doubled up as my gym subscription. For lighting I’d use beeswax candles.
Many people label me an anti-capitalist. Whilst I do believe capitalism is fundamentally flawed, requiring infinite growth on a finite planet, I am not anti anything. I am pro-nature, pro-community and pro-happiness. And that’s the thing I don’t get – if all this consumerism and environmental destruction brought happiness, it would make some sense. But all the key indicators of unhappiness – depression, crime, mental illness, obesity, suicide and so on are on the increase. More money it seems, does not equate to more happiness.
Ironically, I have found this year to be the happiest of my life. I’ve more friends in my community than ever, I haven’t been ill since I began, and I’ve never been fitter. I’ve found that friendship, not money, is real security. That most western poverty is spiritual. And that independence is really interdependence.
Could we all live like this tomorrow? No. It would be a catastrophe, we are too addicted to both it and cheap energy, and have managed to build an entire global infrastructure around the abundance of both. But if we devolved decision making and re-localised down to communities of no larger than 150 people, then why not? For over 90 per cent of our time on this planet, a period when we lived much more ecologically, we lived without money. Now we are the only species to use it, probably because we are the species most out of touch with nature.
People now often ask me what is missing compared to my old world of lucre and business. Stress. Traffic-jams. Bank statements. Utility bills. Oh yeah, and the odd pint of organic ale with my mates down the local.”

consumed-youth:

Irishman Mark Boyle tried to live life with no income, no bank balance and no spending. Here’s how he finds it:

"If someone told me seven years ago, in my final year of a business and economics degree, that I’d now be living without money, I’d have probably choked on my microwaved ready meal. The plan back then was to get a ‘good’ job, make as much money as possible, and buy the stuff that would show society I was successful.

For a while I did it – I had a fantastic job managing a big organic food company; had myself a yacht on the harbour. If it hadn’t been for the chance purchase of a video called Gandhi, I’d still be doing it today. Instead, for the last fifteen months, I haven’t spent or received a single penny. Zilch.

The change in life path came one evening on the yacht whilst philosophising with a friend over a glass of merlot. Whilst I had been significantly influenced by the Mahatma’s quote “be the change you want to see in the world”, I had no idea what that change was up until then. We began talking about all major issues in the world – environmental destruction, resource wars, factory farms, sweatshop labour – and wondering which of these we would be best devoting our time to. Not that we felt we could make any difference, being two small drops in a highly polluted ocean.

But that evening I had a realisation. These issues weren’t as unrelated as I had previously thought – they had a common root cause. I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect is the factor that unites these problems.

The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that it now means we’re completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the ‘stuff’ we buy.

Very few people actually want to cause suffering to others; most just don’t have any idea that they directly are. The tool that has enabled this separation is money, especially in its globalised format.

Take this for an example: if we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today.

If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior décor.

If we had to clean our own drinking water, we probably wouldn’t shit in it.

So to be the change I wanted to see in the world, it unfortunately meant I was going to have to give up money, which I decided to do for a year initially. So I made a list of the basics I’d need to survive. I adore food, so it was at the top. There are four legs to the food-for-free table: foraging wild food, growing your own, bartering and using waste grub, of which there far too much.

On my first day I fed 150 people a three course meal with waste and foraged food. Most of the year I ate my own crops though and waste only made up about five per cent my diet. I cooked outside – rain or shine – on a rocket stove.

Next up was shelter. So I got myself a caravan from Freecycle, parked it on an organic farm I was volunteering with, and kitted it out to be off the electricity grid. I’d use wood I either coppiced or scavenged to heat my humble abode in a wood burner made from an old gas bottle, and I had a compost loo to make ‘humanure’ for my veggies.

I bathed in a river, and for toothpaste I used washed up cuttlefish bone with wild fennel seeds, an oddity for a vegan. For loo roll I’d relieve the local newsagents of its papers (I once wiped my arse with a story about myself); it wasn’t double quilted but it quickly became normal. To get around I had a bike and trailer, and the 55 km commute to the city doubled up as my gym subscription. For lighting I’d use beeswax candles.

Many people label me an anti-capitalist. Whilst I do believe capitalism is fundamentally flawed, requiring infinite growth on a finite planet, I am not anti anything. I am pro-nature, pro-community and pro-happiness. And that’s the thing I don’t get – if all this consumerism and environmental destruction brought happiness, it would make some sense. But all the key indicators of unhappiness – depression, crime, mental illness, obesity, suicide and so on are on the increase. More money it seems, does not equate to more happiness.

Ironically, I have found this year to be the happiest of my life. I’ve more friends in my community than ever, I haven’t been ill since I began, and I’ve never been fitter. I’ve found that friendship, not money, is real security. That most western poverty is spiritual. And that independence is really interdependence.

Could we all live like this tomorrow? No. It would be a catastrophe, we are too addicted to both it and cheap energy, and have managed to build an entire global infrastructure around the abundance of both. But if we devolved decision making and re-localised down to communities of no larger than 150 people, then why not? For over 90 per cent of our time on this planet, a period when we lived much more ecologically, we lived without money. Now we are the only species to use it, probably because we are the species most out of touch with nature.

People now often ask me what is missing compared to my old world of lucre and business. Stress. Traffic-jams. Bank statements. Utility bills. Oh yeah, and the odd pint of organic ale with my mates down the local.”

(Source: consumed-youth, via forest--taurus)

2:16 pm - Wed, Sep 3, 2014
101,991 notes
2:07 pm
3,353 notes
11:43 am
27 notes
There’s no path to liberation that doesn’t pass through the shadow.
Jay Michaelson, (via larameeee)

(via gnothyself)

9:09 am - Tue, Sep 2, 2014
232,585 notes
10:55 am - Fri, Aug 29, 2014
11,582 notes

universalequalityisinevitable:

Dr. James Gilligan on crime, revenge, and punishment, from this video.

(via sagansense)

9:58 am
679 notes
It is my conviction that there is no way to peace - peace is the way.
 Thích Nhất Hạnh (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via purplebuddhaproject)

9:56 am
221 notes
endilletante:

Memoires de l’Afghanistan de Roland et Sabrina Michaud, Editions Le Chene, 1985.

endilletante:

Memoires de l’Afghanistan de Roland et Sabrina Michaud, Editions Le Chene, 1985.

(via guruwithin)

9:53 am
272 notes
micdotcom:

Austin’s homeless village project is something every city should try 

Advocates for the homeless in Austin, Tex., are building homes for the needy that take just six hours to assemble.
Led by nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes, the group is constructing a model 27-acre town called the Community First! Village, which will cost around $7 million and ultimately hold up to 240 people. 
How it will save the city $10 million | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Austin’s homeless village project is something every city should try 

Advocates for the homeless in Austin, Tex., are building homes for the needy that take just six hours to assemble.

Led by nonprofit Mobile Loaves & Fishes, the group is constructing a model 27-acre town called the Community First! Village, which will cost around $7 million and ultimately hold up to 240 people. 

How it will save the city $10 million | Follow micdotcom

9:51 am
19,267 notes
5:32 pm - Thu, Aug 28, 2014
937 notes
The heart is a
thousand-stringed instrument
that can only be tuned with
love
5:31 pm
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